Why does Montresor keep suggesting that they go back?

Perhaps the most important reason is that it will make Montresor seem perfectly harmless to Fortunato. If Montresor keeps suggesting going back, then he can’t be leading him anywhere that could be dangerous. But Montresor knows that Fortunato could easily become suspicious.

Why does Montresor stop working when Fortunato begins rattling his chains?

This preview shows page 1 – 3 out of 3 pages. 5. Montresor stops working when Fortunato begins rattling his chains because Montresora)is exhausted.

What flaws led to Montresor’s downfall?

Fortunato’s affinity for wine and his excessive pride are also significant character flaws that lead to his demise. Fortunato is clearly inebriated during his interactions with Montresor, which affects his judgment and causes him to let his guard down.

Why did Montresor make sure Fortunato is drunk?

Why does Montresor make sure Fortunato drinks a lot of wine? Montresor makes Fortunato drink a lot of wine so that he doesn’t suspect anything to be going on, because his in drunk. It makes it easier for Montresor to get his revenge. Fortunato is not in the right state of mind and he doesn’t know what is going on.

Who died in the cask of Amontillado?

Fortunato

How was Fortunato killed in the cask of Amontillado?

In Poe’s classic short story “The Cask of Amontillado,” Montresor explains how he executed his careful plans and murdered his enemy named Fortunato. Montresor murders Fortunato by burying him alive. Fortunato more than likely died of asphyxiation or starvation behind the wall that Montresor erected.

How does Montresor lure Fortunato away from the carnival?

Fortunato is lured by this flattery, & by his competition with Luchesi (the other connoisseur). He is also drawn by the promise of Amontillado, which is a very rare dry sherry. Fortunato has already been drinking and celebrating during carnival, and he is easily convinced.

What does Fortunato do to Montresor to make him so full of revenge?

Montresor believes that it is essential to avoid being punished while enacting revenge upon a person. As the story progresses, Montresor deceives Fortunato by acting amiably toward him before leading him down into his family’s catacombs, where Montresor shackles and buries Fortunato alive.

What does Fortunato finally realize?

The moment Fortunato finally realizes that Montresor plans to harm him takes place when he begins to sober up and moan. Montresor says, I had scarcely laid the first tier of the masonry when I discovered that the intoxication of Fortunato had in a great measure worn off.

Is Montresor free at the end of the story?

By the end of the story, Montresor is free and Fortunato has been dead for 50 years, trapped in Montresor’s catacomb.

What insult does Fortunato inflicts on Montresor?

It is never known for sure how, or even if, Fortunato insulted Montresor in “The Cask of Amontillado.” All the reader knows is that Montresor claims to have suffered a “thousand injuries” at the hands of Fortunato.

What is ironic about the narrator’s conversation with Fortunato once they enter the catacombs?

Fortunado has a cough and a cold when they entered the catacombs. It becomes ironic when he drink wine and thought of his cough with concern. It has been said that the author made the story like this because he is having a hard time of what will the conversation flow be between Fortunado, Montresor and Amontillado.

Who did Montresor kill?

Did Montresor confess?

Montresor is not confessing but writing a description of an event in his life of which he seems to be proud. The fact that he has waited fifty years to tell anyone about it only is intended to demonstrate that he has gotten away with a perfect crime.

What is Fortunato’s first flaw?

According to Montresor, Fortunato’s one weakness is the pride he takes in “his connoisseurship in wine.” It is this pride that Montresor plans to exploit in order to lure his nemesis, Fortunato, into his family catacombs so that he can wall the man in and guarantee his tortured and painful death.