What medical conditions qualify for flu jab?

The flu vaccine is offered free on the NHS to anyone with a serious long-term health condition, including: respiratory conditions, such as asthma (needing steroid inhaler or tablets), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including emphysema and bronchitis. diabetes.

What is the principle on which a vaccine acts?

Vaccines contain antigens that stimulate the immune system to produce an immune response that is often similar to that produced by the natural infection. With vaccination, however, the recipient is not subjected to the disease and its potential complications.

How is bacteria used to make vaccines?

Use part of the bacteria Several vaccines are made by taking toxins and inactivating them with a chemical (the toxin, once inactivated, is called a toxoid). By inactivating the toxin, it no longer causes disease. The diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis vaccines are made this way.

Are there 2 different flu vaccines this year?

For 2020-2021, all flu vaccines except one are quadrivalent. The only trivalent flu vaccine available this year is Fluad, an adjuvant vaccine for people aged 65+. (Confusingly, Fluad is available this year in both trivalent and quadrivalent forms.)

What makes a successful vaccination program?

Successful immunisation programmes generally result from high vaccine effectiveness and adequate uptake of vaccines. In the development of new vaccination strategies, the structure and strength of the local healthcare system is a key consideration.

What is the difference between a vaccine and an immunization?

Vaccination: The act of introducing a vaccine into the body to produce immunity to a specific disease. Immunization: A process by which a person becomes protected against a disease through vaccination.

Is your immune system weaker after a vaccine?

Also, vaccines do not make a child sick with the disease, and they do not weaken the immune system. Vaccines introduce a killed/disabled antigen into the body so the immune system can produce antibodies against it and create immunity to the disease.

Are all flu shots the same 2020?

Are all influenza vaccines the same? All influenza vaccines contain antigen derived from the same influenza viruses, with the one difference being that trivalent vaccines have 3 different antigens and quadrivalent vaccines have four different antigens (the same three that are in the trivalent vaccines, plus one more).

How do vaccines prevent microbial infection?

Vaccines are made from microbes that are dead or inactive so that they are unable to cause disease. The antigen in the vaccine is the same as the antigen on the surface of the disease-causing microbe. The vaccine stimulates the body to produce antibodies against the antigen in the vaccine.

How long should you wait between flu shots?

Vaccination should continue to be offered throughout the flu season, even into January or later. Children who need two doses of vaccine to be protected should start the vaccination process sooner, because the two doses must be given at least four weeks apart.

How are vaccines determined to be safe and effective?

FDA scientists and medical professionals carefully evaluate all the available information about the vaccine to determine its safety and effectiveness. Most common side effects of a vaccine are identified in studies before the vaccine is licensed.

What is live vaccine example?

Live virus vaccines use the weakened (attenuated) form of the virus. The measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine and the varicella (chickenpox) vaccine are examples. Killed (inactivated) vaccines are made from a protein or other small pieces taken from a virus or bacteria.

What disease caused by a virus is vaccinated against with a new vaccine every autumn and winter?

Seasonal flu is a highly infectious disease caused by a virus. It occurs every year, usually in the winter. The most likely viruses can be identified in advance and vaccines are then produced that closely match them. Vaccination is available to help protect people who are more at risk.

What is the principle that makes vaccines effective in preventing diseases?

Principles of Vaccination To produce an immune response, live attenuated vaccines must replicate (grow) in the vaccinated person. A relatively small dose of virus or bacteria is administered, which replicates in the body and creates enough of the organism to stimulate an immune response.

How long are you contagious after starting Tamiflu?

You are still contagious on Tamiflu. The flu is contagious about one day before symptoms begin and up to a week after symptoms start.

What flu strains are in the 2020 vaccine?

The committee recommended that the quadrivalent formulation of egg-based influenza vaccines for the U.S. 2020-2021 influenza season contain the following:

  • an A/Guangdong-Maonan/SWL1536/2019 (H1N1) pdm09-like virus;
  • an A/HongKong/2671/2019 (H3N2)-like virus;
  • a B/Washington/02/2019- like virus (B/Victoria lineage);

How does the body respond to vaccines?

Your immune system reacts to the vaccine in a similar way that it would if it were being invaded by the disease — by making antibodies. The antibodies destroy the vaccine germs just as they would the disease germs — like a training exercise. Then they stay in your body, giving you immunity.

Why are there 2 different flu vaccines this year?

These flu vaccines are slightly different because they protect against four different strains of the flu virus (two influenza A viruses and two influenza B viruses). Because of this, these vaccinations can provide broader protection from infection. Options are below.