What is the Morgan pocket technique?

What is the Morgan pocket technique?

Modification of the Rhea Morgan Pocket Technique for replacement of prolapsed third eyelid glands (Cherry Eye). In this procedure, an elliptical incision is made in the superficial conjunctiva overlying the third eyelid gland.

What is the best treatment for cherry eye?

But eye drops are not a cure for cherry eye. Usually, the vet-recommended treatment for cherry eye in dogs is surgery to preserve the eyelid. “Surgical repositioning of the gland, not excision, is the recommended treatment since it preserves the important function of tear production,” Vygantas explains.

Is cherry eye surgery Successful?

The preferred method of treating a cherry eye is to surgically reposition the gland into its normal location. The success rate of this procedure is approximately 90%. The remaining 10% of cases, run the risk that gland may reprolapse and require a second surgery.

Is cherry eye surgery painful?

Cherry eye surgery is minimally invasive, but your veterinarian will most likely prescribe pain medication to keep your dog comfortable.

How much does it cost to fix cherry eye?

The cost of Cherry Eye surgery depends upon the extent of the condition, the health of the pet and if the prolapse is in one or both eyes. In general pet owners can expect the average cost of Cherry Eye surgery to average $300 to $500 for one eye and up to $800 for both2.

How serious is cherry eye in dogs?

Although it isn’t an emergency, a cherry eye can cause some severe problems for the dog. The dry eye can be severe enough to cause a lot of pain, pigmentation of the eye and blindness. The treatment for a prolapsed nictitans gland is often surgical.

How much does it cost to have cherry eye surgery?

How much is Cherry Eye surgery? The cost of Cherry Eye surgery depends upon the extent of the condition, the health of the pet and if the prolapse is in one or both eyes. In general pet owners can expect the average cost of Cherry Eye surgery to average $300 to $500 for one eye and up to $800 for both2.

How much does it usually cost to fix a cherry eye?

Can you massage cherry eye back in?

Massage can work to correct canine cherry eye. The idea is to push gently toward the dog’s nose in an attempt to pop the gland back into place. Some dog owners report success after three to four massage sessions; others indicated it took more than a week of massage. Many used warm compresses to ease the process.

What happens if you leave cherry eye untreated?

An untreated “cherry eye” will have decreased tear production and possibly incomplete closure of the eye. This can cause eye infections and dry eye. The dry eye can be severe enough to cause a lot of pain, pigmentation of the eye and blindness. The treatment for a prolapsed nictitans gland is often surgical.

Do cherry eyes come back after surgery?

Harmful complications from Cherry Eye surgery are unusual but recurrence of the cherry eye can happen. An owner should expect some postoperative swelling after Cherry Eye repair but this should resolve and the eye should be comfortable and normal in appearance after about a week.

What is the Rhea Morgan pocket technique for cherry eye?

Modification of the Rhea Morgan Pocket Technique for replacement of prolapsed third eyelid glands (Cherry Eye). In this procedure, an elliptical incision is made in the superficial conjunctiva overlying the third eyelid gland.

How is the conjunctival pocket technique performed?

In the original conjunctival pocket technique, a conjunctivectomy is performed and the suture knots are buried, but in this procedure the conjunctivectomy is eliminated and the knots are placed on the anterior surface of the third eyelid to prevent possible trauma to the cornea. Click here to watch Dr. Rankin perform this surgical method.

What is a cherry eye in a dog?

A prolapsed gland is the most common disorder of the third eyelid in dogs. It is commonly referred to as a cherry eye because the prolapsed gland appears as a red mass that protrudes from behind the third eyelid.

What is the modified Morgan pocket technique for dogs?

This modified Morgan pocket technique allows normal movement of the third eyelid postoperatively. Just follow these steps and achieve an optimal outcome. A prolapsed gland is the most common disorder of the third eyelid in dogs.

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